Thomas Fleming

Thomas Fleming is the former editor of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture. He is the author of The Politics of Human Nature, Montenegro: The Divided Land, and The Morality of Everyday Life, named Editors' Choice in philosophy by Booklist in 2005. He is the coauthor of The Conservative Movement and the editor of Immigration and the American Identity. He holds a Ph.D. in classics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Before joining the Rockford Institute, he taught classics at the University of Miami of Ohio, served as an advisor to the U.S. Department of Education, and was headmaster at the Archibald Rutledge Academy. He has been published in, among others, The Spectator (London), Independent on Sunday (London), Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Chicago Sun-Times, National Review, Classical Journal, Telos, and Modern Age. He and his wife, Gail, have four children and four grandchildren.

Latest by Thomas Fleming in Chronicles

Results: 732 Articles found.
  • July 18, 2014

    The Gentile Church, III: The Galileans

    The early Church faced many grave crises and challenges, many of which can be summed up in one question: What kind of Church was it to be?

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  • July 15, 2014

    The Gentile Church Act II: An Excursus

    To understand how the Church disentangled itself from Judaism, it is necessary to know a little bit about what the term "Jew" means.

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  • August 2014

    And All Shall Equal Be

    This is our annual summer vacation issue, which means I am free to ramble on like an old lizard soaking up gin and sunshine at the beach and telling stories that all begin, “Did I ever tell you about the time . . . ”

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  • July 4, 2014

    The Gentile Church, Act I

    The Prefect was in a difficult spot. As an honest Roman official, he knew better than to get mixed up in the turbulent local politics. The local religious establishment wanted a rebel to be executed.

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  • July 2, 2014

    Problems in Democracy 01

    The House Ethics Committee has changed reporting requirements for members who receive free travel from a variety of groups. The travel will still be reported but only on the House Clerk's website, making it less likely for watchdog groups—aka paid snoops—and journalists—aka professional liars—to keep track of their indubitably corrupt activities.

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  • June 23, 2014

    The Alphaville Dictionary II

    To understand the ideology of the regime, it is necessary to look at some of the most politicized areas of speech, namely everything to do with sex and gender, and—the topic of this installment—race and ethnicity.

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  • June 18, 2014

    The Alphaville Dictionary

    Some years ago, I proposed a series of short pieces on language. The project never materialized, but it is really more appropriate for the website than the magazine. Here is the beginning.

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  • July 2014

    The Wasted Century

    The Great War and its inevitable successor have been called Europe’s civil war, and there is some truth in this characterization.

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  • June 4, 2014

    The Bowe Bergdahl Gaffe

    In the past few days, we have all been witness to the Obama Administration's slip-up on the release of Bowe Bergdahl, and what that tells us about the current masters of the universe is very disquieting.

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  • May 17, 2014

    Zora's World v. Brown

    The 60th anniversary of the Brown v. the Board of Education is being celebrated today with far more pomp than has accompanied Independence Day celebrations in recent years.

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  • June 2014

    Virtual Neighborhoods

    “We’ve turned into a nation of TV watchers, video-game players, and virtual sex addicts,” observed the cheerful old cynic.

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  • April 29, 2014

    Donald Sterling and The Whole Ball of Wax

    The response to Sterling's gaffes on tape has been a rhetorical frenzy among the namby-pambys of our ruling class.

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  • April 19, 2014

    Political Passions, Part II

    American churches cannot make up their minds. Do they serve God or an Uncle Sam who for a long time has been looking a great deal like Mammon?

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  • April 18, 2014

    Political Passion, Part I

    Instead of Philbrick's three merely political identities ("I Led Three Lives: Citizen, "Communist," Counterspy"), we might describe ourselves as: Christian, "Conservative," and Counterrevolutionary.

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  • May 2014

    America’s Grand Strategy

    “Robbing, slaughtering, pillaging they misname sovereign authority, and where they make an empty waste they call it peace.” -Tacitus

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  • Eugenio Corti, R.I.P.

    Eugenio Corti, R.I.P.

    With the death of Eugenio Corti on February 4, Italian literature has lost the last of its great masters.

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  • April 4, 2014

    Defending the Family Castle, Part IV: The End

    Eminent Domain confiscations are a direct threat to private property but perhaps even more sinister are the flagrant violations of the 4th Amendment that Americans have grown to tolerate, much as the English learned to tolerate general writs.

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  • March 31, 2014

    Defending the Family Castle, Part III

    The English/American household was more than a fortified building with locks and bars to keep out unwanted intruders: It was also an autonomous community, whose existence antedated the state.

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  • March 26, 2014

    Defending the Family Castle, Part II

    It was the invasion of property more than the taxes and confiscations themselves that annoyed the Americans and prepared them to resist the Stamp Act. It was not money per se, but the sacred rights of property that were at stake.

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  • March 24, 2014

    Defending the Family Castle, Part I

    Everyone has heard the expression: "An Englishman's home is his castle." The most memorable expression of this proverb was given by the elder William Pitt, the future Lord Chatham.

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Results: 732 Articles found.



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