Samuel Francis

Latest by Samuel Francis in Chronicles

Results: 233 Articles found.
  • How Do I Hate Thee? Let Me Count the Ways

    The cinders of the World Trade Center had barely fallen to the earth before George W. Bush had it all figured out. “America was targeted for attack,” the President explained to the nation barely 12 hours after the first plane hit the Manhattan skyscrapers, “because we’re the brightest beacon for freedom and opportunity in the world.”

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  • December 2001

    Enemies Within and Above

    Within a few hours of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon last September, it had become commonplace for even high-ranking government officials and elected leaders to say publicly that Americans would just have to get used to fewer constitutional liberties and personal freedoms than they have traditionally enjoyed.

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  • Shoot the Losers
    November 2001

    Shoot the Losers

    The novelist F. Reid Buckley once told a story about a Mexican woman who worked for his family as a maid or nanny during the 1930's. The woman knew that Buckley's father, William F. Buckley, Sr., was a strong opponent of Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 presidential campaign.

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  • November 2001

    Bucking the Tide of Progress

    Sen. Jesse Helms' announcement in August of his retirement at the end of his current term was an opportunity for vituperation on the part of the left-wing media that has so detested the North Carolina conservative throughout his entire 30-year political career.

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  • Nobody but the People
    October 2001

    Nobody but the People

    In the "Prologue" to his massive biography of Sen. Joe McCarthy, historian Thomas Reeves describes a scene that took place in Milwaukee, in the senator's home state, in November, 1954, only a month before his colleagues voted to condemn him and thereby effectively to terminate his career.

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  • Dirty for Dirty
    August 2001

    Dirty for Dirty

    It is not known if the late, unlamented Timothy J. McVeigh ever saw Dalton Trumbo's chest-thumping war movie that blatantly propagandizes on behalf of blowing the filthy little Japs to smithereens.

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  • July 2001

    Crime Story

    "Behind every great fortune there is a crime," wrote Honoré de Balzac in a cynical sentiment that Mario Puzo chose as the epigraph of The Godfather.

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  • The New Meaning of "Racism"

    The tedium that descended upon the nation's politics last winter when Bush II ascended the presidential throne was relieved briefly in the waning days of the Clinton era by the bitter breezes that wafted around some of the new President's Cabinet appointments.

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  • The Proletarian Weapon

    No sooner had George W. Bush entered the White House and its previous occupants padded off to Harlem, than the news media suddenly began to discover "layoffs," "downturns," and a looming economic crisis that threatened to strip the flesh from the eight fat years that the great and wise Clinton administration bestowed upon us.

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  • Antiquities of the Republic
    April 2001

    Antiquities of the Republic

    Until the triumph of the civil-rights movement at the end of the 1960's, probably the most disruptive and recurrent conflict in American politics came from the struggle between central authority in the federal government and local authority at the level of the states.

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  • The Boringest Man in the World
    March 2001

    The Boringest Man in the World

    Not the least of the ironies of the modern age is that the more it pretends to rationality, the more it wallows in the irrational.

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  • February 2001

    Rout of the Republicans

    The first thing to be said about the presidential election of 2000 is that George W. Bush and the Stupid Party lost miserably. This is true despite their actual victory in the great post-election Florida chicken-scratch because, without Ralph Nader on the ballot, Al Gore would have won the election easily.

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  • January 2001

    Paleoconservatism and Race

    Paleoconservatism, strictly understood, has nothing to say about the natural phenomenon of race or the relationship of race and social environment, any more than it has anything to say about the heliocentric theory of the solar system, the doctrine of transubstantiation, or the authorship of the plays of Shakespeare.

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  • December 2000

    The Constitution, R.I.P.

    On July 22 of this year, the Washington Times published, as the weekly installment of its "Civil War" section, a long article by a gentleman named Mackubin Thomas Owens, described as "professor of strategy and force planning" at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, under the headline, "Secession's apologists gut Constitution, history."

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  • November 2000

    Are We Decadent?

    If there is one premise that serves to unite the Old Right, it is that the West—or America, or Christendom, or whatever label and identity they want to specify—is in trouble, has been in trouble for a long time, and is probably not going to get out of trouble for quite a while, if ever.

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  • Middle American Mellow?
    October 2001

    Middle American Mellow?

    Since the 1960's, American politics at the national level has primarily consisted of an endless search for a new majority.

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  • September 2000

    Processions of the Damned

    "Well, fellow, who are you?" demands the Earl of Warwick of a character who appears on stage for the first time at the end of George Bernard Shaw's play Saint Joan.

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  • September 2000

    One More Wallow In Fantasy?

    The Patriot, Mel Gibson's epic about the American Revolution, opened (by an amazing coincidence) in theaters on Independence Day weekend. And cynics complain that Americans don't take national holidays seriously anymore!

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  • Capitalism the Enemy

    By a margin of 63-56, the South Carolina House of Representatives voted on May 10 to pull down the Confederate battle flag that has fluttered above the state's capitol dome since 1962 and to remove it to "a place of honor" on the capitol grounds.

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  • The Revolution Two-Step

    The new century, not to speak of the new pseudo-millennium, had not even begun last December when one of the scintillating debates typical of the intellectual life of our epoch suddenly erupted over the issue of who was the most important person of the old century.

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Results: 233 Articles found.



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