M.E. Bradford

The Late M.E. Bradford was a professor of English at the University of Dallas.

Latest by M.E. Bradford in Chronicles

Results: 16 Articles found.
  • Imagining the West
    November 5, 2018

    Imagining the West

    As both a reality and an interpretive problem, the American West has retained its long-established hold on the attention of our scholars.

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  • July 2001

    From the Family of the Lion

    There is a popular myth of Abraham Lincoln, our 16th President, that is known to most Americans.

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  • Donald Davidson and the Calculus of Memory
    May 1994

    Donald Davidson and the Calculus of Memory

    The opening scene of the folk opera Singin' Billy, for which Donald Davidson wrote the book and lyrics, takes place in the yard of Callie Wilkins, "Miss Callie," the matriarch of Oconee Town in Pickens County, South Carolina.

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  • July 1992

    A Great Refusal

    As I have previously observed in these pages, each of the ratification conventions with which the people of the 13 original states passed judgment on the handiwork of the Great Convention had its own distinctive drama.

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  • The Prophetic Voice of Donald Davidson
    May 1992

    The Prophetic Voice of Donald Davidson

    No idea is more central to the American political tradition than that of limited government. As a nation we began with our commitment to the liberty of commonwealths, of communities, and of citizens.

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  • Requires Attention

    The "Church Notes" section in the February 2, 1992, issue of National Review requires attention and a word in response.

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  • From the Family of the Lion
    December 1991

    From the Family of the Lion

    There is a popular myth of Abraham Lincoln, our 16th President, that is known to most Americans.

    Read More
  • Imagining the West
    November 1991

    Imagining the West

    As both a reality and an interpretive problem, the American West has retained its long-established hold on the attention of our scholars.

    Read More
  • Visible Saints
    May 1991

    Visible Saints

    There is no other American man of letters quite like Marion Montgomery. With the addition of each new book to the canon of works published by the Sage of Crawford, his achievement becomes the more astonishing; the range and depth of his thought, its variety and scope the more impressive.

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  • The Process of Ratification
    February 1991

    The Process of Ratification

    Even as we, in our own time, go about revising, or refusing to revise, our fundamental law, so did our Fathers in the beginning vote to put such law in its place: that is, one state at a time, reflecting, after vigorous dispute, 13 different majorities, some of them very belated—and very reluctant.

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  • Poisoned at the Source
    July 1990

    Poisoned at the Source

    When on January 3, 1949, Lyndon Baines Johnson of Texas was sworn in as a United States senator, an era in the politics of his state had come to an end, a period that had begun when Reconstruction concluded.

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  • The Critic and the Conservative Imagination
    February 1990

    The Critic and the Conservative Imagination

    Because of the great range of his interests, it is very difficult to predict what Professor Jeffrey Hart will next produce. Hart writes out of a devotion to literature as "the principal vehicle for transmitting the ideas and feelings that constitute our shared public culture."

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  • February 1989

    A View From the Top of the Ridge

    For the last several weeks, working at a leisurely pace, I have been reading through the new and extremely ambitious Columbia Literary History of the United States. This is a huge work, one which has many merits and aspires to be inclusive.

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  • A Dike To Fence Out the Flood
    December 1987

    A Dike To Fence Out the Flood

    When in September of 1787 the new instrument of government proposed by the Great Convention went out from Philadelphia to be received and considered by the several commonwealths connected through the old Articles of Confederation, those fraternally affiliated societies saw the document delivered to them through the Continental Congress according to their own needs and purposes.

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  • With Laurel: For Andrew Lytle
    June 1987

    With Laurel: For Andrew Lytle

    What makes it so appropriate that Andrew Lytle should receive the Richard M. Weaver Award for Scholarly Letters is that Mr. Lytle is one of the gifted people who inspired Dick Weaver's career as what he called "an Agrarian in exile."

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  • The Costs of Culture
    December 1985

    The Costs of Culture

    Because I have spoken sharply to the general question of Federal support for arts and letters, and because my name is connected with certain facets of the public business, I receive through the mails a mass of publications designed to justify past or projected government funding for cultural activities.

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Results: 16 Articles found.



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