Mark Tooley

Mark Tooley is president of the Institute on Religion and Democracy and the author of Taking Back the United Methodist Church.

Latest by Mark Tooley in Chronicles

Results: 24 Articles found.
  • Out With the Old

    The 1.67 million member Presbyterian Church (USA) has voted to redefine marriage from “between a woman and a man” to “between two people, traditionally a man and a woman.”

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  • Fighting for Orthodoxy Among the Methodists
    December 2009

    Fighting for Orthodoxy Among the Methodists

    The Episcopal Church, with two million members, drove off the cliff in 2003 by electing its first openly homosexual bishop. In 2005, the United Church of Christ (1.1 million members) officially endorsed same-sex “marriage,” though the UCC had already long been ordaining active homosexuals.

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  • May 2008

    The Bishops’ Tale

    Last December, Anglican Archbishop Rowan Williams was roundly criticized for publicly denying the Christmas story. “Archbishop Says Nativity a Legend,” the Daily Telegraph headline screamed, igniting a transatlantic controversy over the ostensibly Grinch-like prelate.

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  • The Bombast and Glory of William Jennings Bryan
    October 2007

    The Bombast and Glory of William Jennings Bryan

    For three decades, William Jennings Bryan streaked across the sky of American politics, his brightness never fading despite countless failures. Renowned for his zealous Christian faith, he appropriately expired immediately after his final and most glorious defeat, at the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925.

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  • Mysteries of the Mockingbird
    May 2007

    Mysteries of the Mockingbird

    Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird has sold over 30 million copies since its publication in 1960. Hardly a high-school student in America over the last 40 years has graduated without having read the 1930’s-era drama of a small-town Southern lawyer who defends an innocent black man accused of rape by a white woman.

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  • April 2006

    Methodists and Sex

    The United Methodist Church, having declined from 11 to 8 million members in the United States, spent millions on a television and newspaper ad campaign called “Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors.”

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  • October 2005

    Episcopalians Go Interfaith

    An interfaith education conference in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Episcopal Church warned that evangelicals and evangelism are potential obstacles to positive relations between Christianity and other religions.

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  • May 2005

    SpongeBob and a Transgendered Sock Puppet

    Cultural debate over sex roles has reached such a fever pitch that even the sexual preference of the children’s cartoon character SpongeBob Squarepants has become a topic of great concern.

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  • September 2004

    Omnigendered Christianity

    By some measures, the influence of feminist theology peaked in the 1990’s. It is still around, however, acting as a supporting pillar for liberal religion’s latest preoccupation: the elimination of “gender.”

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  • July 2004

    Mushy Ecclesial Thinking

    National headlines greeted the recent acquittal of a lesbian United Methodist minister by a church court in Washington state. Is America’s third-largest religious denomination going the way of the “gay”-friendly Episcopal Church, secular reporters wondered?

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  • September 2002

    The End of the NCC?

    The declining National Council of Churches, once the mouthpiece of America’s mainline Protestant denominations, is struggling to find a new purpose. At its May 2002 board meeting, the NCC discussed its latest ecumenical outreach, an attempt to incorporate Roman Catholics and evangelicals.

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  • November 2001

    Gods of Inclusion

    Although America remains overwhelmingly Christian in affiliation (if not necessarily in practice), the connoisseurs of multiculturalism like to pretend otherwise—often rather insistently.

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  • June 2001

    Duke Chapel, Then and Now

    In December, the dean of the chapel at Duke University in North Carolina, along with the school's president, announced that same-sex "weddings" could be celebrated at Duke's imposing Gothic chapel.

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  • May 2001

    Church Arsons: The Real Story?

    It was one of the biggest stories of 1996: Black churches were burning all across the South, the seeming victims of a nationwide upsurge in racial hatred. Tens of thousands of horrified Americans rushed to contribute money toward the reconstruction of black churches.

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  • March 2001

    Debating the "Gentile Vice"

    At its annual "Ministers Week" lectures last year, the theological school of Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas provided a revealing window into the contemporary debate within mainline church circles over homosexuality.

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  • October 2000

    A Methodist Revival

    Methodism, America's third-largest religious denomination, eagerly embraced the Social Gospel nearly a hundred years ago. It supported labor unions, civil rights, and a moderate welfare state.

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  • June 2000

    The Growing Irrelevance of the NCC

    The National Council of Churches (NCC) is the Hugh Hefner of the religious world: aging and not dealing well with it, trapped in the fashions of the 1960's and 1970's, financially troubled, and still offensive but no longer shocking

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  • May 2000

    Out of the Closet and Into the Schools

    Relying upon federal legislation intended to allow Bible clubs equal access in high schools, a student homosexual group is demanding not only meeting space but official approval at a Salt Lake City high school.

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  • Fueling Culture Wars

    "Discrimination" is one of today's buzzwords, and laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation are fueling some of the sharpest skirmishes within America's culture wars.

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  • December 1999

    A Postmodern Yahweh for Episcopalians

    I had expected to find a small gathering of eccentric Episcopalians in a basement lecture hall. Instead, the National Cathedral was overflowing with a Christmas Eve-sized crowd.

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Results: 24 Articles found.



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