Forrest McDonald

Forrest McDonald (1927-2016) was Distinguished Research Professor of History at the University of Alabama. He was the Sixteenth Jefferson Lecturer in the Humanities in 1987 and was awarded the Ingersoll Prize in 1990. Dr. McDonald was the author of countless essays and many books, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist, Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Intellectual Origins of the Constitution, as well as Alexander Hamilton: A Biography, and The American Presidency: An Intellectual History.

Latest by Forrest McDonald in Chronicles

  • Character in Acting
    July 25, 2019

    Character in Acting

    To 18th-century Britons and Americans who devoted any serious thought to the subject of human nature—and a great many did—the conventional starting point was the theory of the passions, or drives for self-gratification. Rousseau to the contrary, man was not naturally good but was ruled by his passions, both primary (fear, hunger, lust) and secondary (cravings for money, power, certainty, status).

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  • On the Study of History
    February 1991

    On the Study of History

    American society is in trouble, and not only because our traditional values and institutions are under siege. The nuclear family is crumbling as a result of government policies that are ruthless when they are not mindless.

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  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find
    April 1990

    A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    The road to hell, I was taught as a child, is paved with good intentions. Surely no one could fault the intentions of the Reverend Ralph David Abernathy—Martin Luther King's right arm and successor in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference—as revealed in this fascinating and moving autobiography.

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  • October 1989

    How the Fourteenth Amendment Repealed the Constitution

    The evisceration of the federal system by the Supreme Court during the last few decades—indeed, most of the modem malfeasance of that august body—has been accomplished largely through the instrumentality of the Fourteenth Amendment.

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  • Character in Acting
    June 1987

    Character in Acting

    To 18th-century Britons and Americans who devoted any serious thought to the subject of human nature—and a great many did—the conventional starting point was the theory of the passions, or drives for self-gratification.

    Read More



Latest by Forrest McDonald in ITO

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