Bryce J. Christensen

Latest by Bryce J. Christensen in Chronicles

Results: 40 Articles found.
  • September 5, 2019

    Recovering the Medieval Family

    Hatred of the past ill becomes a historian. Yet it is hard not to detect this disfiguring animus—paired with an overweening love of contemporaneity—in the works of many modern historians of family life.

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  • September 1992

    Petty Squabbles

    Political Correctness continues on many of the nation's campuses. Many Americans still regard the whole affair as a petty squabble among eggheads, unrelated to their daily lives. However, a recent skirmish in the PC wars illustrates only too well why all Americans, especially parents, have a stake in this scholastic conflict.

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  • August 1989

    The Streetwalker's Story

    Prostitution may not deserve its reputation as the world's oldest profession, but it has been around for millennia, appearing in virtually every society.

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  • July 1989

    By Blab Befuddled

    Words cannot take us everywhere, nor should they. Before the most sublime truths, we grow reverently still. Confronted with bestiality, we shudder at the unspeakable. But in the Age of Blab, everything must be talked about."

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  • Raising Concerns

    Child abuse has become a national issue. But close scrutiny of the problem raises doubts about the current crusade to combat it. Before expanding the power of the state to intervene in the home, concerned citizens ought to take a hard look at the evidence.

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  • May 1989

    Updating Paley

    Like many Englishmen of his generation, Charles Darwin in his youth was an avid reader of William Paley's The Evidences of Christianity (1794). As Darwin formulated his theory of evolution, he lost his faith in Paley's argument that nature manifests God's wisdom and foresight.

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  • Dead Souls in the Classroom
    April 1989

    Dead Souls in the Classroom

    "Thanatology" or "death education" now competes with driver's ed and "social problems" for the attention of the nation's high schoolers.

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  • December 1988

    Prayer by Numbers

    When sociologists look at religion, what do they see? Inevitably, they see statistical clusters of churchgoers sorted through ecclesiastical, geographic, and demographic grids.

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  • September 1988

    Galileo Brought to Book, Again

    Galileo Galilei lives in the imagination of every high-school atheist as the archetypal champion of Truth, standing heroically against the malice and superstition of the ecclesiastical authorities who condemned him.

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  • July 1988

    Recovering the Medieval Family

    Hatred of the past ill becomes a historian. Yet it is hard not to detect this disfiguring animus—paired with an overweening love of contemporaneity—in the works of many modern historians of family life.

    Read More
  • April 1988

    Shadows in the Limelight

    An American television viewer will witness more violence in a single evening than an Athenian would have seen during a lifetime of theatergoing.

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  • January 1988

    Cut-Flower Moralists

    Awaiting trial for a murder he did not commit, Dmitri Karamazov is visited in jail in the closing pages of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov by the progressive intellectual Rakitin.

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  • November 1987

    An American Prometheus

    Sprawled on the sands of the New Mexico desert, Isador Isaac Rabi was witness on July 16, 1945, to a demonstration of scientific power so spectacular that neither his welder's glasses nor his analytical training could fully shield him from its awe-inspiring effects.

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  • September 1987

    Plummeting Rates

    America's fertility rates plunged in the early 1970's, falling well below the minimal Zero Population Growth (ZPG) of 2.1 children per American woman. Never before has this happened to the nation while enjoying peace and relative prosperity.

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  • July 1987

    Invasion of the Child-Snatchers

    Who has more rights in the American judicial system—a man accused of murder or one accused of child abuse? The accused murderer is guaranteed the good old English right of trial by jury; he's presumed innocent until proved guilty.

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  • Catastrophic Health Insurance

    Catastrophic health insurance—already endorsed by the President and now on the fast track to approval in Congress—will soon shift the economic burden of huge unexpected medical bills from the elderly to the federal government.

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  • June 1987

    Players of the Game

    The Puritans, who once condemned stool ball, quoits, and bowls, would stand in stern judgment of the millions of Americans who every Sunday choose a ball game over church attendance.

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  • May 1987

    Out of the Closet, Into the Morgue

    Homosexual activists will not like this book. For if ever there were an empirical refutation to the "gay rights" agenda. Gene Antonio has written it. In convincing (sometimes nauseating) detail, Antonio explains why the homosexual movement has provided the ideal conduit for one of the most lethal diseases ever to affect mankind.

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  • December 1986

    Clipping the Angel's Wings

    The ancients, wiser than modem theorists, recognized language as a gift and (at Babel) a curse from the heavens. Even pagans recognized a Word behind words and a Muse beyond music. The Creator of the world was everywhere acknowledged as the bestower of words, giving tremendous powers and social prestige to those initiated into the underlying grammar of both.

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  • May 1986

    A Fragile Blossom

    Feng Jicai's volume of short stories is truly a remarkable work. It is one of the first publications by a writer in the People's Republic of China in which the writer has allowed people to be people.

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Results: 40 Articles found.



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